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Update hexchat screen shot

jessie
Bob Mottram 5 years ago
parent
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abc7826f6c
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4 changed files with 117 additions and 118 deletions
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    - 116
      website/EN/usage.html

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doc/EN/usage.org

@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ The easiest way to use irssi is to connect to your system, like this:
ssh myusername@mydomain -p 2222
#+END_SRC
Then select *IRC* from the menu. However, other than via this method using ssh, irssi isn't a very good IRC client because it doesn't have the capability to onion route messages, and therefore leaks metadata. For the best security when using your IRC server, use XChat or client which supports Tor.
Then select *IRC* from the menu. However, other than via this method using ssh, irssi isn't a very good IRC client because it doesn't have the capability to onion route messages, and therefore leaks metadata. For the best security when using your IRC server, use HexChat or client which supports Tor.
*** HexChat
HexChat (formerly XChat) is compatible with proxying via Tor and so provides the best security when connecting to your IRC server. It will allow you to connect to your IRC server's onion address.
@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ ssh username@mydomainname -p 2222
Select Administrator options, then *About this system* and make a note of the onion address for IRC. Also select the *IRC Menu* and take a note of the login password.
[[file:images/xchat_setup.jpg]]
[[file:images/hexchat_setup.jpg]]
Run HexChat.

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website/EN/usage.html

@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="en" xml:lang="en">
<head>
<!-- 2016-05-03 Tue 09:50 -->
<!-- 2016-05-03 Tue 11:15 -->
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1" />
<title></title>
@ -170,15 +170,15 @@ for the JavaScript code in this tag.
</colgroup>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org6612024">Readme</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org9077c5e">Readme</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org26be483">Improving ssh security</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orge45bf5b">Improving ssh security</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org1c4ec39">Administrating the system via an onion address (Tor)</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgbfd590b">Administrating the system via an onion address (Tor)</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
@ -190,38 +190,38 @@ for the JavaScript code in this tag.
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org9ff08c0">Syncing to the Cloud</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgace58c4">Syncing to the Cloud</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org3d15a36">Play Music</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org81aca49">Play Music</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org8c8fc0d">Microblogging (GNU Social)</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgd09b032">Microblogging (GNU Social)</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgff04fd5">Social Network</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgc2fd8e1">Social Network</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org1e24252">Chat Services</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org2dd17c6">Chat Services</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org685ac90">RSS Reader</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#org5bc9649">RSS Reader</a></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orgf21ff78">Adding or removing users</a></td>
<td class="org-left"><a href="#orge81ee74">Adding or removing users</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<div id="outline-container-org6612024" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org6612024">Readme</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org6612024">
<div id="outline-container-org9077c5e" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org9077c5e">Readme</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org9077c5e">
<p>
After the system has installed a README file will be generated which contains passwords and some brief advice on using the installed systems. You can read this with the following commands:
</p>
@ -242,9 +242,9 @@ To exit you can either just close the terminal or use CTRL-x CTRL-c follo
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org26be483" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org26be483">Improving ssh security</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org26be483">
<div id="outline-container-orge45bf5b" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orge45bf5b">Improving ssh security</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orge45bf5b">
<p>
To improve ssh security you can generate an ssh key pair on your system and then upload the public key to the Freedombone.
</p>
@ -297,9 +297,9 @@ If you wish to only use ssh keys then log in to the Freedombone, become the root
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org1c4ec39" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org1c4ec39">Administrating the system via an onion address (Tor)</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org1c4ec39">
<div id="outline-container-orgbfd590b" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orgbfd590b">Administrating the system via an onion address (Tor)</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orgbfd590b">
<p>
You can also access your system via the Tor system using an onion address. To find out what the onion address for ssh access is you can do the following:
</p>
@ -345,9 +345,9 @@ Subsequently even if dynamic DNS isn't working you may still be able to administ
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org9ff08c0" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org9ff08c0">Syncing to the Cloud</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org9ff08c0">
<div id="outline-container-orgace58c4" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orgace58c4">Syncing to the Cloud</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orgace58c4">
<p>
<a href="https://syncthing.net/">Syncthing</a> provides a similar capability to proprietary systems such as <a href="http://www.drop-dropbox.com/">Dropbox</a>, and also is well suited for use with low power single board computers. You can have one or more directories which are synchronized across your various laptops/desktops/devices, and this makes it hard for you to ever lose important files. The manner in which the synchronization is done is pretty secure, such that it would be difficult for passive adversaries (mass surveillance, "<i>men in the middle</i>", etc) to know what files you're sharing. Of course, you don't necessarily need to be running a server in order to use Syncthing, but if you do have a server which is always running then there's always at least one place to synchronize your files to or from.
</p>
@ -357,9 +357,9 @@ Freedombone provides Syncthing shared directories for each user on the system, p
</p>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org41367ab" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org41367ab">On a laptop</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org41367ab">
<div id="outline-container-org972f0d4" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org972f0d4">On a laptop</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org972f0d4">
<p>
Install syncthing:
</p>
@ -414,9 +414,9 @@ Now wait for a few minutes. Eventually you will see two messages appear within t
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org12a7cf9" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org12a7cf9">On Android</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org12a7cf9">
<div id="outline-container-org1b5a480" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org1b5a480">On Android</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org1b5a480">
<p>
Install Syncthing and Connectbot from F-droid.
</p>
@ -447,12 +447,12 @@ Now wait for a few minutes or more. Eventually you should receive two notificati
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org3d15a36" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org3d15a36">Play Music</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org3d15a36">
</div><div id="outline-container-org782b524" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org782b524">With the DLNA service</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org782b524">
<div id="outline-container-org81aca49" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org81aca49">Play Music</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org81aca49">
</div><div id="outline-container-orgdf01119" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgdf01119">With the DLNA service</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgdf01119">
<p>
An easy way to play music on any mobile device in your home is to use the DLNA service. Copy your music into a directory called "<i>Music</i>" on a USB thumb drive and then insert it into from socket on the Beaglebone.
</p>
@ -493,9 +493,9 @@ The DLNA service will only work within your local home network, and isn't remote
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org8c8fc0d" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org8c8fc0d">Microblogging (GNU Social)</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org8c8fc0d">
<div id="outline-container-orgd09b032" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orgd09b032">Microblogging (GNU Social)</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orgd09b032">
<p>
To log into your GNU Social site first obtain your username and password from the "microblogging" section of the readme file.
</p>
@ -524,20 +524,20 @@ GNU Social has a clutter-free mobile user interface which can be accessed via a
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgff04fd5" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orgff04fd5">Social Network</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orgff04fd5">
</div><div id="outline-container-org58b8d5b" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org58b8d5b">Domains</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org58b8d5b">
<div id="outline-container-orgc2fd8e1" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="orgc2fd8e1">Social Network</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-orgc2fd8e1">
</div><div id="outline-container-org3c65936" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org3c65936">Domains</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org3c65936">
<p>
Both Hubzilla and GNU Social try to obtain certificates automatically at the time of installation via Let's Encrypt. This will likely mean that in order for this to work you'll need to have obtained at least one "official" domain via a domain selling service, since Let's Encrypt mostly doesn't seem to work with free subdomains from sites such as freeDNS.
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org426b91b" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org426b91b">Initial install</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org426b91b">
<div id="outline-container-orgff113ee" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgff113ee">Initial install</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgff113ee">
<p>
On first visiting your Hubzilla site you'll see the login screen. The first thing you need to do is <b>register</b> a new user. The first user on the system then becomes its administrator.
</p>
@ -551,19 +551,19 @@ On first visiting your Hubzilla site you'll see the login screen. The first thin
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org1e24252" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org1e24252">Chat Services</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org1e24252">
</div><div id="outline-container-orgc371afa" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgc371afa">IRC</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgc371afa">
<div id="outline-container-org2dd17c6" class="outline-2">
<h2 id="org2dd17c6">Chat Services</h2>
<div class="outline-text-2" id="text-org2dd17c6">
</div><div id="outline-container-org766ebde" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org766ebde">IRC</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org766ebde">
<p>
IRC is useful for multi-user chat. The classic use case is for software development where many engineers might need to coordinate their activities, but it's also useful for meetings, parties and general socialising.
</p>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org23ad9da" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org23ad9da">Irssi</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org23ad9da">
<div id="outline-container-org1f5b875" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org1f5b875">Irssi</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org1f5b875">
<p>
The easiest way to use irssi is to connect to your system, like this:
</p>
@ -575,13 +575,13 @@ The easiest way to use irssi is to connect to your system, like this:
</div>
<p>
Then select <b>IRC</b> from the menu. However, other than via this method using ssh, irssi isn't a very good IRC client because it doesn't have the capability to onion route messages, and therefore leaks metadata. For the best security when using your IRC server, use XChat or client which supports Tor.
Then select <b>IRC</b> from the menu. However, other than via this method using ssh, irssi isn't a very good IRC client because it doesn't have the capability to onion route messages, and therefore leaks metadata. For the best security when using your IRC server, use HexChat or client which supports Tor.
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgc3a1e65" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgc3a1e65">HexChat</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgc3a1e65">
<div id="outline-container-org512a50c" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org512a50c">HexChat</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org512a50c">
<p>
HexChat (formerly XChat) is compatible with proxying via Tor and so provides the best security when connecting to your IRC server. It will allow you to connect to your IRC server's onion address.
</p>
@ -701,7 +701,6 @@ mkdir -p ~/.config/hexchat
</pre>
</div>
<p>
Now look up the onion address for your IRC server
</p>
@ -718,7 +717,7 @@ Select Administrator options, then About this system and make a note of t
<div class="figure">
<p><img src="images/xchat_setup.jpg" alt="xchat_setup.jpg" />
<p><img src="images/hexchat_setup.jpg" alt="hexchat_setup.jpg" />
</p>
</div>
@ -760,9 +759,9 @@ Click close and then connect.
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgba98014" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgba98014">Changing or removing the IRC password</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgba98014">
<div id="outline-container-orgb079292" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgb079292">Changing or removing the IRC password</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgb079292">
<p>
By default the IRC server is set up to require a password for users to log in. The password is the same for all users. If you want to change or remove the password:
</p>
@ -780,12 +779,12 @@ Select Administrator controls then IRC Menu and then change the pa
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org99478e9" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org99478e9">XMPP/Jabber</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org99478e9">
</div><div id="outline-container-org1b87a41" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org1b87a41">Using with Profanity</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org1b87a41">
<div id="outline-container-orgc4bb93d" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgc4bb93d">XMPP/Jabber</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgc4bb93d">
</div><div id="outline-container-org441e0bb" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org441e0bb">Using with Profanity</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org441e0bb">
<p>
The <a href="http://profanity.im/">Profanity</a> shell based user interface and is perhaps the simplest way to use XMPP from a laptop. It's also a good way to ensure that your OTR keys are the same even when logging in from different laptops or devices, and it also means that if those devices later become compomised then there are no locally stored OTR keys to be found.
</p>
@ -875,9 +874,9 @@ When accessed via the user control panel the client is automatically routed thro
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgf2ff3cc" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgf2ff3cc">Using with Jitsi</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgf2ff3cc">
<div id="outline-container-org5cbcb15" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org5cbcb15">Using with Jitsi</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org5cbcb15">
<p>
Jitsi is the recommended communications client for desktop or laptop systems, since it includes the <i>off the record</i> (OTR) feature which provides some additional security beyond the usual SSL certificates.
</p>
@ -907,9 +906,9 @@ You can also see this vide
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgc1ad0fb" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgc1ad0fb">Using with Ubuntu</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgc1ad0fb">
<div id="outline-container-org9aa50d6" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org9aa50d6">Using with Ubuntu</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org9aa50d6">
<p>
The default XMPP client in Ubuntu is Empathy. Using Empathy isn't as secure as using Jitsi, since it doesn't include the <i>off the record</i> feature, but since it's the default it's what many users will have easy access to.
</p>
@ -927,17 +926,17 @@ Click on Advanced and make sure that Encryption required and Ig
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org6a5f16e" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org6a5f16e">Using Tor Messenger</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org6a5f16e">
<div id="outline-container-org2dc983" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org2dc983">Using Tor Messenger</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org2dc983">
<p>
Tor Messenger is a messaging client which supports XMPP, and its onion routing enables you to protect the metadata of chat interactions to some extent by making it difficult for an adversary to know which server is talking to which. You can download Tor Messenger from <a href="https://torproject.org/">torproject.org</a> and the setup is pretty simple.
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgfbae828" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgfbae828">Using with Android</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgfbae828">
<div id="outline-container-orgc295f15" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgc295f15">Using with Android</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgc295f15">
<p>
Install <a href="https://f-droid.org/">F-Droid</a>
</p>
@ -973,16 +972,16 @@ Then select Next. When chatting you can use the lock icon to encrypt your
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgd9baee4" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgd9baee4">Tox</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgd9baee4">
<div id="outline-container-org7988223" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org7988223">Tox</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org7988223">
<p>
Tox is an encrypted peer-to-peer messaging system and so should work without Freedombone. It uses a system of nodes which act as a sort of directory service allowing users to find and connect to each other. The Tox node ID on the Freedombone can be found within the README within your home directory. If you have other users connect to your node then you will be able to continue chatting even when no other nodes are available.
</p>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-orgd598cc" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgd598cc">Using the Toxic client</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgd598cc">
<div id="outline-container-org4e94a1b" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org4e94a1b">Using the Toxic client</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org4e94a1b">
<p>
Log into your system with:
</p>
@ -1006,12 +1005,12 @@ Then from the menu select Tox Chat. Tox is encrypted by default and also
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org3e54e14" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org3e54e14">VoIP (Voice chat)</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org3e54e14">
</div><div id="outline-container-orgc073efb" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgc073efb">Using with Ubuntu</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgc073efb">
<div id="outline-container-orgbd8ef4b" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgbd8ef4b">VoIP (Voice chat)</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgbd8ef4b">
</div><div id="outline-container-orgb7d26cb" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgb7d26cb">Using with Ubuntu</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgb7d26cb">
<p>
Within the software center search for "mumble" and install the client then run it. Skip through the audio setup wizard.
</p>
@ -1025,9 +1024,9 @@ Click on "add new" to add a new server and enter the default domain name for the
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org95243ca" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org95243ca">Using with Android</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org95243ca">
<div id="outline-container-orgc4a14f1" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="orgc4a14f1">Using with Android</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-orgc4a14f1">
<p>
Install <a href="https://f-droid.org/">F-Droid</a>
</p>
@ -1054,24 +1053,24 @@ Selecting the server by pressing on it then connects you to the server so that y
</div>
</div>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org48387e1" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="org48387e1">SIP phones</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-org48387e1">
<div id="outline-container-orgf220b08" class="outline-3">
<h3 id="orgf220b08">SIP phones</h3>
<div class="outline-text-3" id="text-orgf220b08">
<p>
Freedombone also supports SIP phones The username and domain is the same as for your email address, and the SIP password and extension number will appear within the README file in your home directory. Various SIP client options are available, such as CSipSimple on Android and Jitsi on desktop or laptop machines. Ideally use clients which support ZRTP, which will provide the best level of security.
</p>
</div>
<div id="outline-container-org34ab3dc" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org34ab3dc">About ZRTP</h4>
<div class="outline-text-4" id="text-org34ab3dc">
<div id="outline-container-org7e3ecce" class="outline-4">
<h4 id="org7e3ecce">About ZRTP</h4>
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<a href="https://jitsi.org/Documentation/ZrtpFAQ">ZRTP</a> appears to be the current best standard to end-to-end encrypted voice calls, combining good security with simplicity of use. When the initial cryptographic negotiation between phones is done at the start of a call a short authentication string (SAS) is calculated and displayed at both ends. To check that there isn't anyone intercepting the call and acting as a <i>man in the middle</i> - as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingray_phone_tracker">stingray type devices</a> try to do - the short authentication string can be read out and verbally confirmed between the callers. If it's the same then you can be pretty confident that the call is secure.
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<h4 id="orgc015dde">Using with CSIPSimple</h4>
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<h4 id="org730d959">Using with CSIPSimple</h4>
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Add an account. Under <b>General Wizards</b> choose <b>Expert</b> and enter the following details:
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@ -1127,9 +1126,9 @@ If everything is working the account should appear in green with a status of
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<h4 id="org605e58f">Using with Ring</h4>
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<h4 id="org1c535a8">Using with Ring</h4>
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From the menu select <b>Manage accounts</b>.
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@ -1182,9 +1181,9 @@ Select the Security tab. Under SRTP Key Exchange select ZRTP
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<h2 id="org685ac90">RSS Reader</h2>
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<h2 id="org5bc9649">RSS Reader</h2>
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The way that RSS reading is set up on Freedombone gives you strong reading privacy. Not only is there onion routing between you and the server but also between the server and the source of the RSS feed. The only down side is that many RSS feeds are still http only, and so could be vulnerable to injection attacks, but it's expected that more of this will go to https in the foreseeable future due to a combination of growing recognition of security issues and systems like Let's Encrypt which make obtaining certificates much easier.
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@ -1228,9 +1227,9 @@ A note for the paranoid is that on mobile devices you get redirected to a differ
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<h2 id="orgf21ff78">Adding or removing users</h2>
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<h2 id="orge81ee74">Adding or removing users</h2>
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<p>
Log into the system with:
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